The importance of failure

“Failure can be the jet fuel to success.”

Some days are easy, some are not.

I say it frequently in my classes:   making mistakes is not failure, it is just part of the process.   The willingness to make mistakes and continue to try are hallmarks of great students.

As a teacher, it can be more complicated.  I continue to try, but do I consider my students who don’t pass the class failures?   Yes and no.   I know that there are different ways to reach these students.   Some require special handling, some mere encouragement, and others may lack some fundamental skills.  That is always part of the job.

Behavior problems are more of a problem.  A lot of mistakes stem not from skill deficits, but from social ones.  A common problem for adult teachers:  what do you do about the student who would rather talk through your class and learn from their friends than from you as a teacher.   This would be fine, except the friends in class don’t have a complete skillset either, and often is a distraction for more than them.   Depending on the situation, you may want to appeal to either the student who is asking questions of their friend, or the one answering them.   There is a time and a place.

Please tell me we are turning the corner...

Then there are the mistakes you make as a teacher.

We are only human, we make mistakes. As teachers, the sooner we acknowledge mistakes the better.  When teaching a skill, if I spot an error that I made it turns into a new teaching opportunity. “See how this happened, and what it will do to the work that follows?”

Beyond mistakes, failure as a teacher can mean two things.  First, failing a student who could have been helped but who wasn’t. Life is busy, and hard, and there are other students to care for, but all of the students need you. The other failure is the student who passes who doesn’t have the skills to succeed.  These are the ones who pass, and don’t deserve it.  They will be a burden to their future classes, and they move forward with a false sense of confidence in their abilities.

Making mistakes is not failure.  I hope my students make mistakes, and continue to learn from them.  I intend on not making it too easy for them until they move on.

 

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