Teaching advice from a Dominatrix

One of my oldest and best friends has left teaching to become a dominatrix.   For people who know her and love her, this is no real surprise… and she is leaving behind many kids who were very well behaved.   No, she didn’t do anything to her classes in any stereotypical do-what-I-say-or-I will-flog-you sense (that would be just plain creepy!).   Instead, she just had an air of control, competence, and je ne sais quoi that kept her class in line.

Now hopefully she’ll get paid for her talents.

I’ve learned a great deal about teaching from her.   I was warned about teaching at a community college that I would need to manage the discipline of adults.   It was true:  adult students talk too, although they don’t text as much.   Over the course of my first year teaching, I also learned that teaching was less about the course material and just as much about keeping the attention of the students.

Being a good teacher is just as much about showmanship as it is about giving good information.     Each class is, in its own way, a scene.   You set the mood, lay out what needs to happen, and watch as they struggle.   Encourage them, and let them know they can take more.   Really, it seems scary, but it it kind of fun when you get into it.   Oh yeah… oh yeah….

Sorry, I was having a moment.

The truth about being a dominatrix isn’t (necessarily) about inflicting pain, or about being a bully.   It is about having a big personality, about making scary things sexy and fun, and an attitude that lets others know you are in charge.

Just like teaching.

Its good being evil.   I love my job.

 

One thought on “Teaching advice from a Dominatrix

  1. Timon says:

    Perhaps that’s why I never did so good with discipline. That was always my weak point. I had wonderful ideas, and could convey them, but classroom control always frustrated me to the extent of my finally leaving the profession. If only I were in a classroom where discipline issues were non-existent.

    Ah, that’s right, I was. My first year of teaching. The next year, my second graders took over a gifted class. Admittedly, I started out with a 2nd 3rd split class with high second graders and well behaved third graders. I taught most things at a third grade level, and not knowing better, expected 4th grade work. Nevertheless, this was a low-income school with historically low scores. The gifted class was at a different school, and fed by five other elementary schools. The next year, 80% of the students in the gifted class had been in my 2nd grade class.

    Does it stand to reason that I was an amazing teacher from the get-go, and the kids were lucky to be in my class? Well, I would say they were lucky to be in the class, but only because it was a proper learning environment. The next year I had 3 major discipline problems, and no students went on to gifted, despite there being some very smart kids in the class.

    If teachers could dedicate more of their time towards teaching, and less towards the few kids who don’t want to be there, think of how smart most would be. It is my experience that most kids actually enjoy learning when they are in a proper environment. If we could provide them this environment, we could be a country of geniuses.

    On the other end of the scale, I did quite a bit of subbing in classes with the worst behavior problems. The amount of structure, and the adult-to-student ratio made these the best behaved classes I have ever taught in. These students were also getting what they needed.

    Perhaps, instead of the gifted programs, we need more classes for students who cannot control themselves. Make it a goal worth fighting for to reach the normal classroom where students can study on their own. Whether these classrooms are run by a dominatrix or by teachers who are focusing on discipline and study skills first can be up for debate, but providing an environment structured for learning should not be.

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